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Emergency preparedness, Escape planning and Burn awareness

Emergency Preparedness

  • Discuss what to do in an evacuation. When told by officials, go immediately to a shelter as instructed or to the home of a friend or relative who lives out of the area. Find out about your local shelters beforehand.
  • Know evacuation routes. Pre-establish several different routes in case certain roads are blocked or closed.
  • Family members can become separated during an emergency. Be prepared by creating a plan for how to reach one another. Establish an out-of-area contact (such as a relative or friend) who can coordinate family members’ locations and information should you become separated. Make sure children learn the phone numbers and addresses, and know the emergency plans.
  • Quiz children every six months so they remember what to do, where to go, and whom to call in an emergency.
  • Decide how to take care of pets. Pets are not allowed in places where food is served, so you will need to have a place to take your pets if you have to go to a shelter.
  • Post emergency phone numbers (fire, police, ambulance, etc.) by the phone.
  • Assemble a family disaster supplies kit and keep a smaller one in the trunk of your vehicle.

 

Escape planning
Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.

In 2014, there were an estimated 367,500 reported home structure fires and 2,745 associated civilian deaths in the United States.

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm.

 

Burn awareness

Most “fire-related injuries” are burns. In fact, approximately every 60 seconds someone in the U.S. sustains a burn injury serious enough to require treatment.* Increased awareness of the dangers can prevent injuries. Keep your family safe by learning how to prevent burns.

National Burn Awareness Week is observed the first full week in February, and it is designed to provide an opportunity for burn, fire and life safety educators to unite in sharing a common burn awareness and prevention message in our communities. NFPA provides a number of resources to help keep kids, adults and communities safe and aware of potentially harmful situations.

 

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